Advanced Computer And Technology

Get the hands-on, problem-solving skills needed to get started in a variety of computer fields. To sum it up (and maybe oversimplify a bit), computer engineers design and build computers. Computer scientists design and develop computer programs, software, and applications. IT professionals then use and troubleshoot those programs, software, and applications. These three professions all work together to make sure hardware, software, and user interface (UI) come together smoothly so that computers can carry out the tasks businesses and individuals need from them.

ABCya is the leader in free educational computer games and mobile apps for kids. The innovation of a grade school teacher, ABCya is an award-winning destination for elementary students that offers hundreds of fun, engaging learning activities. No matter the level, from the associates to the master’s degrees, the Computers and Technology programs at Embry-Riddle are designed to teach you the real-world skills necessary to succeed in today’s technologically advanced workplace.

Computer engineering technologists are in high demand and that demand will increase in the future as technological advances spread to more industries. Our graduates are responsible for design, construction and troubleshooting of complex digital equipment and systems. Companies who hire our graduates produce business, automation and scientific equipment.

Technology’s explosive evolution is becoming ever more pervasive in commerce and culture, increasing the need to investigate and analyze digital data and assist in the prevention and prosecution of malicious information, theft and corruption. UAT’s computer forensics degree fully prepares students for this exciting career field in which demand is escalating for graduates with this specialized technology computer forensic degree.

The Institute of Advanced Study (IAS) computer is a multi-year research project conducted under the overall supervision of world-famous mathematician John von Neumann. The notion of storing both data and instructions in memory became known as the ‘stored program concept’ to distinguish it from earlier methods of instructing a computer. The IAS computer was designed for scientific calculations and it performed essential work for the US atomic weapons program. Over the next few years, the basic design of the IAS machine was copied in at least 17 places and given similar-sounding names, for example, the MANIAC at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; the ILLIAC at the University of Illinois; the Johnniac at The Rand Corporation; and the SILLIAC in Australia.