BSc (Hons) Computer Games Technology. Manchester Metropolitan University

Computers and those professionals that maintain, troubleshoot, program, administer, network, and build them are central to most every industry. Computers are important to all parts of the economy, and the number of careers that involve work with computers is constantly expanding. Students in the AAS degree program in applied computer technology take courses to prepare them for careers that involve maintaining computer software and hardware, installing and maintaining computer networks, and working with a variety of computer applications.

This course introduces students to the core mathematical constructs that underlie information technology. It is designed to provide a good base for future technical and programming courses. Topics to be covered include select topics from discrete mathematics such as Boolean algebra, numeric systems and data representation, as well as algebraic fundamentals such as algebraic operations, functions, equations and logarithms, linear systems, vectors and matrices.

IEEE-CS technical contributors include Erik DeBenedictis, Sandia National Laboratories; Fred Douglis, systems researcher and member of IEEE-CS Board of Governors; David Ebert, professor, Purdue University; Paolo Faraboschi, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Fellow; Eitan Frachtenberg, data scientist; Phil Laplante, professor, Penn State University; and Dejan Milojicic, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Distinguished Technologist and IEEE Computer Society past president. The technical contributors for this document are available for interview.

At MIT, researchers begin experimenting with direct keyboard input to computers, a precursor to today´s normal mode of operation. Typically, computer users of the time fed their programs into a computer using punched cards or paper tape. Doug Ross wrote a memo advocating direct access in February. Ross contended that a Flexowriter – an electrically-controlled typewriter – connected to an MIT computer could function as a keyboard input device due to its low cost and flexibility. An experiment conducted five months later on the MIT Whirlwind computer confirmed how useful and convenient a keyboard input device could be.

Performing far better than the company projections of 3,000 units for the first year, in the first month after its release Tandy Radio Shack´s first desktop computer — the TRS-80 — sells 10,000 units. The TRS-80 was priced at $599.95, included a Z80 microprocessor, video display, 4 KB of memory, a built-in BASIC programming language interpreter, cassette storage, and easy-to-understand manuals that assumed no prior knowledge on the part of the user. The TRS-80 proved popular with schools, as well as for home use. The TRS-80 line of computers later included color, portable, and handheld versions before being discontinued in the early 1990s.