Computer Information Technology Programs

With advances in technology, demand for computer engineering specialists is high. Not only are graduates with computer-related degrees in demand, they are well compensated. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, among the 10 top-paying majors for 2013-14 were computer science, which ranked second at $67,300 annually, computer engineering fourth at $66,600, and electrical engineering seventh at $62,300. Students who successfully complete the certificate program requirements will be eligible for a Certificate in Computer Systems Technology. If you meet these requirements, please apply to graduate.

There’s no doubt about it – the gaming industry has long since grown since the days of Atari and Game Boys. With the growth of technology, games have become more and more realistic, with virtual reality designs sending joysticks to the background. Do you hope to create the next hit video game? Do you have a creative mind and a love for fun and games? Game design is definitely not all play; it’s a challenging, yet rewarding career if you have the energy and passion for it.

When Xerox PARC loaned the Stanford Engineering Department an entire Alto Ethernet network with laser printer, graduate student Andy Bechtolsheim re-designed it into a prototype that he then attached to Stanford’s computer network. Sun Microsystems grows out of this prototype. The roots of the company’s name came from the acronym for Stanford University Network (SUN). The company was incorporated by three 26-year-old Stanford alumni: Bechtolsheim, Vinod Khosla and Scott McNealy. The trio soon attracted UC Berkeley UNIX guru Bill Joy, who led software development. Sun helped cement the model of a workstation having an Ethernet interface as well as high-resolution graphics and the UNIX operating system.

Performing far better than the company projections of 3,000 units for the first year, in the first month after its release Tandy Radio Shack´s first desktop computer — the TRS-80 — sells 10,000 units. The TRS-80 was priced at $599.95, included a Z80 microprocessor, video display, 4 KB of memory, a built-in BASIC programming language interpreter, cassette storage, and easy-to-understand manuals that assumed no prior knowledge on the part of the user. The TRS-80 proved popular with schools, as well as for home use. The TRS-80 line of computers later included color, portable, and handheld versions before being discontinued in the early 1990s.

The admission requirement for computer systems and engineering tech programs at Ontario colleges is an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent, with a grade 12 English and mathematics credit. Additional mathematics classes may be required. Another significant problem can be the selection of software installed on technology 32 – instructors trained in one set of software (for example Ubuntu 33 ) can be expected to have difficulty in navigating computers donated with different software (for example Windows XP ).