Computer Technology

With advances in technology, demand for computer engineering specialists is high. British Columbia’s high tech sector is growing rapidly, with Vancouver becoming a global hub for the IT industry. The continued growth of the IT sector creates demand for a range of IT professionals, including support analysts, network administrators, web developers, business and systems analysts, security specialists, system integrators, and more.

UAT’s Web Design Degree introduces students to the process of designing and deploying web design and infrastructures, creating content and maintaining websites with a fundamental shift to web 2.0 technologies and deployment of web technologies to mobile devices. As a current CIS, CPT, or CNT major, you will continue to receive college credit for the courses you have already taken, and will earn an AAS Computer Information Technology degree in one of the five declared concentrations upon completion of the graduation requirements.

The Computer Technology program provides students with the knowledge and training for a range of positions in information technology, based on the specific course selections of the student. Students in the program have their choice from several standard program options, each with different concentrations of courses from modern areas of computer technology. These areas include: computer programming, networking, system administration, web development, PC maintenance and database management. Graduates of the various options may be qualified, respectively, for entry-level positions in system administration, computer programming, web development or database management, as well as positions as computer support specialists, and network or PC repair technicians. Graduates are also well prepared to continue their education in four-year BS programs in networking, computer science or system administration.

Acorn’s ARM RISC microprocessor is first used in the company’s Archimedes computer system. One of Britain’s leading computer companies, Acorn continued the Archimedes line, which grew to nearly twenty different models, into the 1990s. Acorn spun off ARM as its own company to license microprocessor designs, which in turn has transformed mobile computing with ARM’s low power, high-performance processors and systems-on-chip (SoC).

The 1401 mainframe, the first in the series, replaces earlier vacuum tube technology with smaller, more reliable transistors. Demand called for more than 12,000 of the 1401 computers, and the machine´s success made a strong case for using general-purpose computers rather than specialized systems. By the mid-1960s, nearly half of all computers in the world were IBM 1401s.