Information Resources And Computer Technology

American Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology (AJCSIT) is an intercontinental free access, peer reviewed journal. The College appoints Program Advisory Committee members for diploma, degree, certificate and apprenticeship programs. Committees are composed of employers, practitioners and recent program graduates. College representatives (students, faculty, and administrators) are resource persons. Each committee advises the Board on the development of new programs, the monitoring of existing programs and community acceptance of programs.

Computer Technology at WSU is an interdisciplinary program. Students have the opportunity to take engineering technology and computer science courses. This exposes students to more faculty members, more cutting edge technology, and more ideas. While students cross-train they also have the opportunity to work with students from both departments, so they graduate with an extended “personal network” as well.

As computer technology becomes increasingly important, the number of careers in the field continues to grow. Computer and Information Science (CIS) offers students the opportunity to study this dynamic science. The minor in computer information technology (CIT) teaches students about the development and management of business databases, computer networks, web applications, and software systems.

Students and instructors in a full-time science, technology, engineering or mathematics program are entitled to a number of additional Microsoft software packages through Conestoga’s Microsoft Partner Agreement. In order to be eligible for graduation, students who are not completing the co-op must complete the diploma program requirements within three years of entering the program. Those who graduate with a co-op designation have five years to complete the program.

Each program has a course sequence or a proper order in which to take classes. It is important that students take their classes following the course sequences provided by the department because foundational or prerequisite classes contain information that utilized in the upper level courses. Have students research computer history. Have each student choose an earlier stage of the computer and compare and contrast it with computers we use today.