International Journal Of Computers & Technology

Computer professionals must have good reasoning and logical problem solving abilities, be observant, alert to detail and tenacious in pursuing problems to completion. Thanks to advancements in their very own field, computer and information technology students can now earn degrees online that are very similar in both content and delivery as traditional on-campus programs. Teleconferencing, virtual classrooms, high-tech learning platforms, and web-based simulations all make online learning a rich and dynamic experience for students who choose to participate in this form of distance education. These technologies have also transformed online degrees from their previous status as poor substitutes for real” degrees to their current position—one in which they are given as much, or in a few cases more, credence than traditional credentials.

The College appoints Program Advisory Committee members for diploma, degree, certificate and apprenticeship programs. Committees are composed of employers, practitioners and recent program graduates. College representatives (students, faculty, and administrators) are resource persons. Each committee advises the Board on the development of new programs, the monitoring of existing programs and community acceptance of programs.

One of the most important distinctions amongst computer information technology online programs is the matter of synchronous versus asynchronous content delivery. Schools that deliver their course content synchronously hold their classes in real-time via teleconference and require students to log in at a set time. On the other hand, those colleges and universities that deliver content asynchronously use web-based modules and recorded lectures to enable their students to complete their coursework on their own schedules, foregoing real-time classroom instruction. Some computer information technology online programs offer a blend of synchronous and asynchronous courses.

Advanced programming and development techniques focussed on the data structures and algorithms that underpin Computer Science. Static data structures: implementation and use. Problem decomposition, module abstraction. Dynamic data structures: pointers linked lists graphs and trees. Object oriented: design implementation and use. Application implementation and component reuse. Algorithms: sorting searching and graph traversal. Basic complexity issues: time and space complexity. Software development techniques.

Analytical and design skills are at the forefront of this ever-evolving career. Hardware- and software-integrated system implementations, testing, maintenance and the need for continuous improvement and upgrading keep graduates at the top of their game. Graduates work for technology companies, organizations and government departments that need computer engineers, and many more.