Rct

The Computer Technology (CT) program has been developed to provide training in the principles underlying the design of modern computer systems. This unit provides a practical and theoretical overview of programming for computer games, games design, industries and audiences. Students will learn how to critically evaluate current debates in games design and apply practical production skills. Includes industries and gaming cultures, narrative and storytelling in games, alternative and serious games, design strategies, game rules and prototyping, the architecture of a computer game, game flow and logic, user interaction, device input and game state feedback, 2D and 3D game environments, game characters, animation, sound, scene control and scripting, introduction to game physics, introduction to artificial intelligence for games, controlling behaviour of non-player characters, chasing and evading, simple pathfinding.

Students should have a working knowledge of MS Office and Office Suite prior to starting the program. Computer Skills for College COMP CO002 or equivalent is recommended. Register online on the Continuing Education website. Computer science and other technology majors are some of the most common programs for online learning, for a lot of reasons. First of all, people who are interested in a degree in the computing field are generally pretty comfortable with technology, and can handle the unique challenges of an online degree.

Each program has a course sequence or a proper order in which to take classes. It is important that students take their classes following the course sequences provided by the department because foundational or prerequisite classes contain information that utilized in the upper level courses. Have students research computer history. Have each student choose an earlier stage of the computer and compare and contrast it with computers we use today.

Steve Jobs, forced out of Apple in 1985, founds a new company – NeXT. The computer he created, an all-black cube was an important innovation. The NeXT had three Motorola microprocessors and 8 MB of RAM. Its base price was $6,500. Some of its other innovations were the inclusion of a magneto-optical (MO) disk drive, a digital signal processor and the NeXTSTEP programming environment (later released as OPENSTEP). This object-oriented multitasking operating system was groundbreaking in its ability to foster rapid development of software applications. OPENSTEP was used as one of the foundations for the new Mac OS operating system soon after NeXT was acquired by Apple in 1996.

Assistant Professor Jun Li’s research targets network security, distributed systems, Internet protocols, and network simulation and performance analysis. His ongoing research projects include automatic defense against unknown self-propagating Internet worms through distributed monitoring; detecting and tracing attacks against the BGP routing protocol; robust communication architecture for security monitoring and warning systems; and secure data sharing among data clients.