School Of Computer Technology

Computers and those professionals that maintain, troubleshoot, program, administer, network, and build them are central to most every industry. However, schools and educational curriculum should not replace teachers with computers, because a computer is just a tool which can be of no function without a teachers guide. This means that we shall still need and will always need to have teachers in the classrooms, but use computers to help them do their job easily and also attract students to get involved in academic activities. The exact effectiveness of computers is not yet clear, but it can not be denied that they have simplified the way we learn. Without computers, educational facilities like ”online education or long distance learning” would be next to impossible.

This course introduces the fundamental principles and techniques for designing and developing effective Web sites. Topics include: hand-coding pages with HTML; styling text and content with CSS; adding dynamic features with client-side scripting techniques; server-side scripting, and, managing files and Web sites using FTP software. Students will also be introduced to information architecture and interface design, XML, as well as advanced mark-up techniques using DHTML. This course is the foundation for more advanced web courses.

Database Systems is an introduction to database design and access, with a focus on database concepts, data modeling, normalization, data warehousing, query languages, and the formulation of complex queries. Students are able to incorporate theory with hands-on learning in the Cybersecurity Engineering Lab, Digital Systems Lab, and Software Development Lab, to name a few.

Completion of a cohesive set of classes, called the Domain Emphasis Package, determined though consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and requiring approval by the department chair prior to enrollment in any course contained in the package. This package should focus on a specific domain in which the graduate plans to start their career. Such a package shall consist of 15 units, with no more than 6 units of lower division classes chosen strategically to meet the prerequisites of the other classes also included in the package. The package cannot contain courses offered by the Department of Computer Science or the College of Business and Economics.

In a widely circulated paper, mathematician John von Neumann outlines the architecture of a stored-program computer, including electronic storage of programming information and data – which eliminates the need for more clumsy methods of programming such as plugboards, punched cards and paper. Hungarian-born von Neumann demonstrated prodigious expertise in hydrodynamics, ballistics, meteorology, game theory, statistics, and the use of mechanical devices for computation. After the war, he concentrated on the development of Princeton´s Institute for Advanced Studies computer.