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A complete history of computing would include a multitude of diverse devices such as the ancient Chinese abacus, the Jacquard loom (1805) and Charles Babbage’s “analytical engine” (1834). In addition to the new tech skills you’ll develop, you’ll also benefit from learning the basics of logic, design and engineering. A good foundation in these disciplines won’t just help you write code and de-bug software – they’ll help you in other areas of your life and studies, too. Cloud computing refers to the storing and accessing of data and programs over the Internet instead of on another type of hard drive. Examples of Cloud services include iCloud, Google Cloud and Dropbox.

Ask students if they know who invented the computer. If they don’t know, inform them that, in 1884, Charles Babbage, an English mathematician, tried to build a complicated machine called the “analytical engine.” It was mechanical, rather than electronic, and Babbage never completed it, but computers today are based on many of the principles he used in his design. Your students may be interested to know that, as recently as forty years ago, computers were so large that they filled whole rooms. They were so complicated that only specially trained people were able to use them.

The Johnniac computer is one of 17 computers that followed the basic design of Princeton’s Institute of Advanced Study (IAS) computer. It was named after John von Neumann, a world famous mathematician and computer pioneer of the day. Johnniac was used for scientific and engineering calculations. It was also repeatedly expanded and improved throughout its 13-year lifespan. Many innovative programs were created for Johnniac, including the time-sharing system JOSS that allowed many users to simultaneously access the machine.

The open source technology degree is about community involvement in software development. As the open source culture has matured, it has become ubiquitous in the software development industry. Students in UAT’s open source technologies, a software engineering degree program will be immersed in this rapidly expanding environment and contribute to real-world, open source software projects.

Started by a group of engineers that left Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), Data General designs the Nova minicomputer. It had 32 KB of memory and sold for $8,000. Ed de Castro, its main designer and co-founder of Data General, had earlier led the team that created the DEC PDP-8. The Nova line of computers continued through the 1970s, and influenced later systems like the Xerox Alto and Apple 1.